Giving Tuesday: 30% of Your Purchase Price Goes To Support Mamas and Babies in Need.

What is that scary yellow fire hazard tag on your PJs?

what the whaaaaa? (image of fire hazard tag from children's pajamas) - why is this scary tag on my kids' pajamas?
/
Ever seen this tag on your kid's PJs and freaked out a little wondering why your little one's pajamas are SO flammable? 
Before you get any more freaked, just know that having that tag on your kiddo's clothes is a GOOD thing. 
.
But why? Let's investigate:
.
 the history - image of some cartoon style houses on fire - it all started with some house fires in the 1940s
.
THE HISTORY
.
Back in the 1940s a handful of children tragically passed away while wearing fast burning nylon fibers. 
.
So in 1953 a law was passed requiring children's pajamas and mattresses (among other things) be treated with flame retardant before going to market. 
 .
It should be noted: 
Many speculate that the tobacco industry was behind the lobbying for this law- redirecting blame for house fires on clothing + furniture manufacturers... and away from a more likely culprit: cigarettes. (Check out the full report by the Chicago Tribune on this topic here.) 
.
whoops. toxic chemicals bin. There was one itty bitty problem with that law...
.
An itty bitty problem with that law... 
.
In 1977 reports started coming out that the two main chemicals used to make goods fire retardant were VERY dangerous & tied to higher rates of cancer. 
...
Even the 'safer' chemicals were linked to hyperactivity and lower IQ scores in kiddos. 
.
So they made a change (only took them 19 years...) 
.
In 1996 the law was amended so that pajamas from natural, untreated, fibers like cotton or bamboo could be sold, but only as long as they had this warning tag on them regarding fit + flammability.
To follow under the law untreated pajamas need to fit tightly (which is why you might feel the need to size up on kids' PJs from some of your favorite brands). 
.
Side note: image of palm print tropical sleep sack - sleep sacks are not classified as clothing or sleepwear .
A side note about sleep sacks: 
Sleep sacks are technically blankets, and so long as they are marketed as worn over clothing, are exempt from the tight fitting/flame retardant rule. (A tight fitting sleep sack wouldn't be safe for rolling babies.) 
.
But what about non-natural fibers like polyester? 
Some fabrics, like polyester, are naturally flame retardant and don't have to be tested or treated OR have the hang tag. 
That said - polyester is not a breathable fiber (= sweaty baby) and kinda yucky in general for your skin (its lack of breathability makes your skin warmer and exacerbates skin issues like eczema and rashes.) 
.
long story short: don't fear the flammability tags.
/
So basically - buy the PJs with the scary flammability tags. They are the best and safest bet for your littles. 
(Also, it's worth noting: smoke inhalation is more dangerous in a fire than the material your kid is wearing...) 
 

Related Posts

7 Baby Sleep Tips You Can Try At Home Now!
7 Baby Sleep Tips You Can Try At Home Now!
 Written by: Maria Lopez, Sleep Consultant   1. Avoid helping your baby fall asleep. They key to consolidated sleep...
Read More
6 Ways to Style Your Sleep Romper
6 Ways to Style Your Sleep Romper
When we created our Women's Sleep Rompers, we wanted to make something that was super comfortable for sleep, but also...
Read More
How early can I introduce a lovey?
How early can I introduce a lovey?
The AAP recommends absolutely nothing in the crib until at least one year of age. No bumpers, no blankets (duh - get ...
Read More

Leave a comment

Please note, comments must be approved before they are published